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Friday, April 21, 2006

Misfired Mailing?

Apparently there was a bit of talk about this flyer that was sent out by David Yassky, Democratic congressional candidate from the Brooklyn district which includes the Lubavitcher neighborhood of Crown Heights. The mailing found its way into the mailboxes of an entirely different demographic than the Chassidic and Orthodox one to which it was clearly designed to reach out. I would have to imagine that the flyer, with a color head shot of a Shmura Matzah and Kiddush cup, a reference to the Four Questions, and a campaign promise of "a nurse in every Yeshiva" might not have impressed the audience, apparently heavily African-American and Carribean, that actually received the mailing.

More here and here.

9 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Why include a pictue of something that's flat, flaky, stale and tasteless. And while we're at it, what's the matza doing there?

7:43 PM  
Blogger Rebecca said...

oops!

8:58 PM  
Blogger Charlie Hall said...

'something that's flat, flaky, stale and tasteless'

Like the eight pounds of matzah that we have left over from Pesach?

11:29 PM  
Blogger Still Wonderin' said...

Big deal. If anything, the campaign should have sprung for better list analytics. That's the worst sin (albeit significant) I see here.

11:34 PM  
Blogger Steg (dos iz nit der ┼íteg) said...

Hmmm... supposedly Jewish, but actually Caribbean... he didn't send these to the neighborhood known as Real Flatbush, did he? ;-)

3:01 AM  
Blogger Krum as a bagel said...

I'm wondering how this ad looks to its intended audience. Frankly, to my eyes this ad is at worst offensive and at best ineffective. Does he really think that a Lubavitcher is going to vote for this guy because he knows about the four kashas?

I also think that the ad points to a huge double standard out there when it comes to use of religious symbols in politics. Just imagine the uproar (mainly from lefty blogs) if a southern congressman used Jesus or other Christian symbols in a political ad. For some reason Jewish religious symbols are viewed as benign and sentimental in political discourse.

3:18 PM  
Blogger Still Wonderin' said...

I'm wondering how this ad looks to its intended audience. Frankly, to my eyes this ad is at worst offensive and at best ineffective.

you're jaded and cynical. Trust me, this looks benign and cozy to the voters it is intended to reach.

Does he really think that a Lubavitcher is going to vote for this guy because he knows about the four kashas?

No. He hopes his name will register as "Jewish" when the voter reaches the polls, whioch is how many, many people make decisions about who to vote for.

I also think that the ad points to a huge double standard out there when it comes to use of religious symbols in politics. Just imagine the uproar (mainly from lefty blogs) if a southern congressman used Jesus or other Christian symbols in a political ad. For some reason Jewish religious symbols are viewed as benign and sentimental in political discourse.

are you kidding? you're just saying that because "bagel" is a jewish name and you're not on the mailing lists that receive the fundamentalist messages. EVERy constituency is oandered to in the language and symbolism that they are most familar. It's a fact of political marketing.

6:08 PM  
Blogger Still Wonderin' said...

oandered = pandered

8:49 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

This flier reminds me of the mailers Jeff Katz sent out in the Five Towns of himself wearing a Yamurka, hanging out with a bunch of little boys with Yamurkas. The ad stated something along the lines, "this community needs someone to represent us!".

I am Jewish, not Orthodox, and was quite offended that Mr. Katz was gearing his Five Towns campaigning so strongly to one side of the community.

This is politics.

8:36 AM  

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